Doctoral Qualifying Exams: Part 7 – Instructional Technology Reading List

The Instructional Technology reading list was not quite as long as the Religious Studies reading list (144 items compared to 194 items).  And, I read this list over the course of several years in my Instructional Technology program before the qualifying exams.  I didn’t have to read and digest all of these 144 items in a compressed six month time period as I did with Religious Studies.  Granted, many of the ideas in the Religious Studies reading list were not necessarily new.  I just had not read most of the books and articles on the list prior to the exam.  I had read about 200 other books and articles on similar topics over the years of my Biblical Studies graduate programs.

Below is the list of books and articles I read in preparation for the Instructional Systems Technology qualifying exams at Indiana University.  The exams took place January-February 2005.

  1. Adams, C., & Cross, T. (2000). Distance learning opportunities for academically gifted students. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 11(22), 88-96.
  2. Albanese, M. A., & Mitchell, S. (1993). Problem-based learning:  A review of literature on its outcomes and implementation issues. Academic Medicine, 68(1), 52-81.
  3. Anglin, G. J. (1995). Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed.). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  4. Banathy, B. (1991). System design of education. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.
  5. Bates, A. W. (1994). Distance education. In T. Husen & T. N. Postlethwaite (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of education (2nd ed.). Oxford, England: Elsevier Science.
  6. Bhola, H. S. (1988). The CLER model of innovation, diffusion, planned change, and development: A conceptual update and applications. Knowledge in Society: The International Journal of Knowledge Transfer, 1(4), 56-66.
  7. Boice, R., & Jones, F. (1984). Why academicians don’t write. Journal of Higher Education, 55(5), 567-582.
  8. Bonner, J. (1998). Implications of cognitive theory for instructional design. Educational Communication and Technology Journal, 36(1), 4-14.
  9. Braden, R. A. (1996). Visual literacy. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology. New York: Macmillan.
  10. Brandenburg, D., & Binder, C. (1999). Emerging trends in human performance interventions. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  11. Brethower, D. M. (1995). Specifying a human performance technology knowledge base. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 8(2), 6-16.
  12. Brethower, D. M. (1999). General systems theory and behavioral psychology. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  13. Brouillette, L. (2001). How colleges can work with schools. Chronicle of Higher Education, 47(24), B16-B17.
  14. Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  15. Burkman, E. (1987). Factors affecting utilization. In R. Gagné (Ed.), Instructional technology: Foundations (pp. viii, 473). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  16. Burton, J., Moore, D., & Magliaro, S. (1996). Behaviorism and instructional technology. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology. New York: Macmillan.
  17. Clark, R. (1991). When researchers swim upstream: Reflections on an unpopular argument about learning from media. Educational Technology, Feb 1991, 34-40.
  18. Clark, R. E. (1983). Reconsidering research on learning from media. Review of Educational Research, 53(4), 445-459.
  19. Clark, R. E. (1988). The future of technology in educational psychology. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  20. Clark, R. E. (1989). Current progress and future directions for research in instructional technology. Educational Technology Research & Development, 37(1), 57-66.
  21. Clark, R. E. (1994a). Media and method. Educational Technology Research & Development, 42(3), 7-10.
  22. Clark, R. E. (1994b). Media will never influence learning. Educational Technology Research & Development, 42(21-29).
  23. Clayton, J. S. (1979). Comment: Inhibitors to the application of technology. Educational Communication and Technology Journal, 27, 157-163.
  24. Corry, M., Frick, T., & Hansen, L. (1997). User-centered design and usability testing of a web site: An illustrative case study. Educational Technology Research and Development, 45(4), 65-76.
  25. Cuban, L. (1988). Teachers & machines: The classroom use of technology since 1920. New York: Teachers College Press.
  26. Dale, E. (1946). Audiovisual methods in teaching (1st ed.). New York: Dryden Press.
  27. Davies, I. K. (1981). Instructional technique. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  28. DeCorte, Verschaffel, & Lowyck. (1994). Computers and learning. In T. Husen & T. N. Postlethwaite (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of education (2nd ed.). Oxford, England: Elsevier Science.
  29. The definition of educational technology: AECT task force on definition and terminology. (1977). Washington, D.C.: Association for Educational Communications and Technology.
  30. DeVito, J. D. (1996). The learning organization. In R. Craig (Ed.), The ASTD training and development handbook (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  31. Dick, W. (1997). Better instructional design theory: Process improvement or reengineering? Educational Technology, Sept/Oct., 47-50.
  32. Dick, W., & Carey, L. (1996). The systematic design of instruction (4th ed.). New York: Scott Foresman.
  33. Dillon, A., & Gabbard, R. (1998). Hypermedia as an educational technology: A review of the quantitative research literature on learner comprehension, control, and style. Review of Educational Research, 68(3), 322-349.
  34. Dormant, D. (1986). The abcd’s of managing change. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Introduction to performance technology. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  35. Dormant, D. (1999). Implementing human performance technology in organizations, Implementing Human Performance Technology in Organizations (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  36. Dorsey, L. T., Goodrum, D., & Schwen, T. (1995). Rapid collaborative prototyping as an instructional design paradigm. 1-30.
  37. Driscoll, M. (1994). Psychology of learning for instruction. Needham, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
  38. Driscoll, M. (1995). Paradigms for research in instructional systems. In G. J. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed.). Englewood, CO.
  39. Driscoll, M. (2000). Psychology of learning for instruction (2nd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
  40. Duck, J. (1993). Managing change: The art of balancing. Harvard Business Review, Nov-Dec 1993, 109-119.
  41. Duffy, T., & Cunningham, D. (1996). Constructivism: Implications for the design and delivery of instruction. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology. New York: Macmillan.
  42. Ely, D. P., Foley, A., Freeman, W., & Scheel, N. (1995). Trends in educational technology 1991. In G. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed., pp. 34-60). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, Inc.
  43. Eraut, M. (1994). Educational technology: Conceptual framework and historical development. In T. Husen & T. N. Postlethwaite (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of education (2nd ed., pp. 1882-1899). Oxford, England: Elsiever Science.
  44. Ertmer, P., & Newby, T. (1993). Behaviorism, Cognitivism, Constructivism: Comparing critical features from an instructional design perspective. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 6(4), 50-71.
  45. Foray, W. R., & Moller, L. (1999). Advancing the field through research. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (pp. 701-714). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  46. Foshay, W., Moller, L., Schwen, T., Kalman, H., & Haney, D. S. (1999). Research in human performance technology. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (2nd ed., pp. 895-915). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  47. Frick, T. (2004). Scope of knowledge created through disciplined inquiry. Unpublished manuscript, Bloomington, IN.
  48. Gagne, R., & Merrill, M. D. (1990). Integrative goals for instructional design. Educational Technology Research & Development, 38(1), 23-30.
  49. Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York: Basic Books.
  50. Grabinger, R. S. (1996). Rich environments for active learning. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 665-692). New York: Macmillan.
  51. Hannafin, M. (1985). The status and future of research in instructional design and technology. Journal of Instructional Development, 8(3), 24-30.
  52. Hannafin, M., & Hannafin, K. (1995). The status and future of research in instructional design and technology revisited. In G. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed., pp. 314-321). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  53. Hannafin, M., Hannafin, K., Hooper, S., Rieber, L., & Kini, A. (1996). Research on and research with emerging technologies. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 378-402). New York: Macmillan.
  54. Hannafin, M., & Rieber, L. P. (1989). Psychological foundations of instructional design for emerging computer-based instructional technologies, Part 1. Educational Technology Research & Development, 37(2), 91-101.
  55. Hartley, J. (1996). Text design. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 795-820). New York: Macmillan.
  56. Hedberg, J., Brown, C., & Arrighi, M. (1997). Interactive multimedia and web-based learning: Similarities and differences. In B. H. Khan (Ed.), Web-based instruction (pp. 47-58). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.
  57. Heinich, R., Molenda, M., Russell, J., & Smaldino, S. (1999). Instructional media and technologies for learning (6th ed.). Columbus, OH: Prentice-Hall.
  58. Hutchins, C. L. (1996). Systemic thinking: Solving complex problems. Aurora, CO: Professional Development Systems.
  59. Jacob, E. (1988). Clarifying qualitative research: A focus on traditions. Educational Researcher, Jan/Feb, 17-24.
  60. Johnston, J. (1987). Electronic learning: From audiotape to videotape. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  61. Kaufman, R., Keller, J., & Watkins, R. (1995). What works and what doesn’t: Evaluation beyond Kirkpatrick. Performance & Instruction, Nov-Dec, 205-209.
  62. Kifer, E. (1995). Evaluation: A general view. In G. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed.). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  63. Kirkpatrick, D. L. (1994). Evaluating training programs: The four levels. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
  64. Klein, J. D. (2002). Empirical research on performance improvement. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 15(1), 99-110.
  65. Knowles, M. S. (1996). Adult learning. In R. L. Craig (Ed.), The ASTD training and development handbook (4th ed., pp. 253-265). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  66. Knupfer, N. N., & McLellan, H. (1996). Descriptive research methodologies. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 1196-1212). New York: Macmillan.
  67. Kozma, R. (1991). Learning with media. Review of Educational Research, 61(2), 179-211.
  68. Kozma, R. (1994). Will media influence learning? Reframing the debate. Educational Technology Research & Development, 42(2), 21-29.
  69. Larson, R. L. (1992). Can the frog become a prince? Context and change in the 1990s. International Journal of Educational Reform, 1(1), 59-68.
  70. Locatis, C., Letourneau, G., & Banvard, R. (1989). Hypermedia and instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 37(4), 65-77.
  71. Mager, R. F. (1964). Analyzing performance problems, or, you really oughta wanna (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: David S. Lake.
  72. Mager, R. F. (1984). Preparing instructional objectives (rev. 2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: David S. Lake.
  73. McIsaac, M., & Gunawardena, C. N. (1996). Distance education. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 403-437). New York: Macmillan.
  74. McKnight, C., Dillon, A., & Richardson, J. (1996). User-centered design of hypertext/hypermedia for education. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 622-633). New York: Macmillan.
  75. McLellan, H. (1996). Virtual realities. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 457-487). New York: Macmillan.
  76. Melton, A. L. (2001). Student progress in self-paced, competency-based individualized science classes in an alternative Philadelphia school. Retrieved January 19, 2002, from the World Wide Web:
  77. Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. ETR&D, 50(3), 43-59.
  78. Mitchell, C. T. (1993). Redefining designing. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  79. Molenda, M. (1992). Soft technologies and school restructuring: Some clarifying propositions. In D. P. Ely & B. B. Minor (Eds.), Educational media and technology yearbook (pp. 77-90). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  80. Molenda, M. (1994). Educational technology in elementary and secondary education. In T. Husen & T. N. Postlethwaite (Eds.), The international encyclopedia of education (2nd ed., pp. 1912-1918). Oxford, England: Elsiever Science.
  81. Molenda, M. (1997). Historical and philosophical foundations of instructional design: A north american view. In R. Tennyson & F. Schott & N. Seel & S. Dikstra (Eds.), Instructional design: International perspectives.  Volume 1: Theory, research, and models (pp. 41-53). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrenece Erlbaum Associates.
  82. Molenda, M., & Bichelmeyer, B. (2005). Issues and trends in instructional technology: Slow growth as economy recovers, Educational media and technology yearbook 2005. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  83. Molenda, M., Pershing, James A., & Reigeluth, Charles M. (1996). Designing instructional systems. In R. Craig (Ed.), The ASTD training and development handbook (4th ed., pp. 266-293). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  84. Molenda, M., & Sullivan, M. (2000). Issues and trends in instructional technology, Educational media and technology yearbook 2000. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  85. Moore, D. M. B., John K.; Myers, Robert J. (1996). Multiple-channel communications: The theoretical and research foundations of multimedia. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 851-875). New York: Macmillan.
  86. Nadler, L., & Wiggs, G. D. (1986). Managing human resource development (1st ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  87. Newby, T. (1992). Training evaluation handbook. San Diego, CA: Pfeiffer.
  88. Nielsen, J. (1994). Usability engineering. Boston, MA: AP Professional.
  89. Overfield, K. (1996). Easy-to-use instructional systems design methodology. Performance & Instruction, 35(4), 10-16.
  90. Pennar, K. (1996, Sept. 16, 1996). How many smarts do you have. Business Week, 104-108.
  91. Pershing, J. L. (2002). Using document analysis in analyzing and evaluating performance. International Society of Performance Improvement, January, 36-42.
  92. Petraglia, J. (1998). The real world on a short leash: The (mis)application of constructivism to the design of educational technology. Educational Technology, 46(3), 53-66.
  93. Rebore, R. W. (2001). Human resources administration in education (6th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
  94. Reeves, T. (2000). Socially responsible educational technology research. Educational Technology(Nov-Dec), 19-28.
  95. Reigeluth, C. (1997). Instructional theory, practitioner needs, and new directions: Some reflections. Educational technology(Jan-Feb), 42-47.
  96. Reigeluth, C., & Frick, T. (1990). Formative research: A methodology for improving design theories. In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theories (Vol. 2, pp. 633-651). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  97. Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). Instructional design theories and models (Vol. 2). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  98. Reiser, R. A. (1987). Instructional technology: A history. In R. Gagne (Ed.), Instructional technology: Foundations (pp. 11-48). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  99. Robinson, D. G., & Robinson, J. C. (1990). Training for impact: How to link training to business needs and measure results. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  100. Rogers, E. (1995). Diffusion of innovations (4th ed.). New York: Free Press.
  101. Rogers, Y., & Scaife, M. (1997). Distributed cognition. Unpublished manuscript, Sussex, England.
  102. Romiszowski, A. J. (1981). Designing instructional systems. New York: Nichols.
  103. Romiszowski, A. J. (1990). The hypertext/hypermedia solution–But what exactly is the problem? In D. H. Jonassen & H. Mandl (Eds.), Designing hypermedia for learning (pp. 321-354). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.
  104. Rosenberg, M. J. (1996). Human performance technology. In R. L. Craig (Ed.), The ASTD training and development handbook (4th ed., pp. 370-393). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  105. Rosenberg, M. J., Coscarelli, W. C., & Hutchinson, C. S. (1999). The origins and evolution of the field. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  106. Ross, S. M., & Morrison, G. R. (1995). Getting started in instructional technology research. Washington DC: Association for Educational Communications and Technology.
  107. Ross, S. M., & Morrison, G. R. (1996). Experimental research methods. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 1148-1170). New York: Macmillan.
  108. Rossett, A. (1996). Job aids and electronic performance support systems, The ASTD training and development handbook (4th ed., pp. 554-578). New York: New York.
  109. Rubin, J. (1994). Handbook of usability testing: How to plan design, and conduct effective tests. New York: Wiley.
  110. Saettler, P. (1990a). The evolution of American educational technology (pp. 3-10). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  111. Saettler, P. (1990b). Beginnings of a science and technology of instruction: 1900-1950, The evolution of American educational technology (pp. 69-81). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  112. Saettler, P. (1990c). Behaviorism and educational technology: 1950-1980, The evolution of American educational technology. Englewood, CO.
  113. Saettler, P. (1990d). Theoretical rationale for the visual instruction movement, The evolution of American educational technology (pp. 140-143). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  114. Salomon, G. (1991). Transcending the qualitative-quantitative debate: The analytic systemic approaches to educational research. Educational Researcher, 20(6), 10-18.
  115. Savenye, W., & Robinson, R. (1996). Qualitative research issues and methods: An introduction for educational technologists. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 1171-1195). New York: Macmillan.
  116. Schiffman, S. (1995). Instructional systems design: Five views of the field. In G. Anglin (Ed.), Instructional technology: Past, present, and future (2nd ed.). Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited.
  117. Schneiderman, B. (1992). Designing the user interface: Strategies for effective human-computer interaction (2nd ed.). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.
  118. Schrock, S. (1984). Naturalistic inquiry: An alternative methodology for instructional development research. In R. K. Bass & C. R. Dills (Eds.), Instructional development: The state of the art (Vol. 2, pp. 333-340). Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.
  119. Schrock, S. (1985). Faculty perceptions of instructional development and the success/failure of an instructional design program: A naturalistic study. Educational Communication and Technology Journal, 33(1), 16-25.
  120. Schrock, S., & Coscarelli, W. (2000). Criterion-referenced test development. Washington  DC: International Society for Performance Improvement.
  121. Schuller, C. F. (1986). Some historical perspectives on the instructional technology field. Jounal of Instructional Development, 8(3), 3-6.
  122. Schwen, T. M. (1977). Professional scholarship in educational technology: Criteria for judging inquiry. Communication Review, 25(5-24).
  123. Schwen, T. M., Goodrum, D., & Dorsey, L. T. (1993). On the design of an enriched learning and information environment (ELIE). Educational Technology, 33(11), 5-9.
  124. Seels, B., & Richey, R. (1994). Instructional Technology: The definition and domains of the field. Washington, DC: AECT.
  125. Senge, P. (1994). The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. New York: Doubleday.
  126. Skinner, B. F. (1968). The technology of teaching. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.
  127. Spitzer, D. R. (1999). The design and development of high-impact interventions. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (2nd ed., pp. 163-184). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  128. Stolovitch, H., & Keeps, E. (2002). Telling ain’t training. Alexandria, VA: American Society for Training & Development.
  129. Sykes, G. (1996). Reform of and as professional development. Phi Delta Kappan, 77(7), 464-467.
  130. Thiagarajan, S. (1993). Just-in-time instructional design. In G. Piskurich (Ed.), The ASTD handbook of instructional technology (pp. 20.21-20.23). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  131. Thiagarajan, S. (1996). Instructional games, simulations, and role-plays. In R. L. Craig (Ed.), The ASTD training and development handbook (4th ed., pp. 517-533). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  132. Tiffin, J. (1978). Problems in instructional television in Latin America. Revista de Tecnologia Educativa, 4(2).
  133. Trochim, W. M. K. (2001). Research methods knowledge base (2nd ed.). Cincinnati, OH: Atomic Dog Publishing.
  134. Van den Akker, J. (1994). Designing innovations from an implementation perspective. In T. P. Husen, T. Neville. (Ed.), The international encyclopedia of education (2nd ed., pp. 1491-1494). Oxford, England: Elsevier Science.
  135. Van Tiem, D., Moseley, J, & Dessinger, J. (2000). Fundamentals of performance technology: A guide to improving people, process, and performance. Washington, D.C.: International Society for Performance Improvement.
  136. Wagner, E. (1999). Beyond distance education: Distributed learning systems. In H. Stolovitch & E. Keeps (Eds.), Handbook of human performance technology (2nd ed., pp. 626-648). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.
  137. Walberg, H. J. (1984). Improving the productivity of America’s schools. Educational Leadership, May 1984, 19-26.
  138. Wang, M. C., Haertel, G. D., & Walberg, H. J. (1993). Toward a knowledge base for school learning. Review of Educational Research, 63(3), 249-294.
  139. Wile, D. (1996). Why doers do. Performance and Instruction, 35(2), 30-35.
  140. Willis, J., & Wright, K. E. (2000). A general set of procedures for constructivist instructional design: The new R2D2 model. Educational Technology, March-April, 5-20.
  141. Winn, W. (1986). Trends and future directions in educational technology research from a North American perspective. Programmed Learning and Educational Technology, 23, 345-355.
  142. Winn, W. (1993). Perception principles. In M. Fleming & W. H. Levie (Eds.), Instructional message design (pp. 55-126). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Educational Technology Publications.
  143. Winn, W., & Snyder, D. (1996). Cognitive perspectives in psychology. In D. H. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research for educational communications and technology (pp. 112-142). New York: Macmillan.
  144. Woodson, W. (1981). Human factors design handbook: Information and guidelines for the design of systems, facilities, equipment, and products for human use. New York: McGraw-Hill.

About Taylor Halverson

I love learning. I love connecting. I love interdisciplinarity.
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